1. Interview: G.L.A.M.S
  2. Social Media: TikTok
  3. Concert review: GLAMS at Dolhuis Dordrecht
  4. Concert review: LOVEBITES at Patronaat
  5. Busan: A City Which Offers Everything From Beaches To Temples
  6. Empress Wu
  7. Game review: Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum ‘n’ Fun!
  8. Review: Hallyucon
  9. Concert review: Crossfaith at Patronaat
  10. Concert Review: BTS at Amsterdam Ziggodome
  11. Interview: LOVEBITES
  12. Changgyeonggung: A Story Of Overcoming Disaster
  13. Band: TwinkleStar- 闪星乐队
  14. Review: AVO J-music Festival 2018
  15. Korean Skincare; The Way To Amazing Skin?
  16. Drama: Meteor Garden
  17. Concert review: Kamijo in Amsterdam
  18. Concert Review: Music Bank in Berlin
  19. HipHop: Higher Brothers
  20. Album: Ex_Machina – CROSSFAITH
  21. Moon festival
  22. Band: LOVEBITES
  23. Chinese Traditional clothing
  24. Double Concertreview: NECRONOMIDOL
  25. Restaurant: Kimchi House – Den Haag with +20 years KPOP fans
  26. Review: Wish
  27. Toreba: a new way to play crane games!
  28. The city of sea and sake: Niigata
  29. Book: The White Book
  30. Restaurant Review: Daikan – Izakaya Bar
  31. Artist: Busters (버스터즈)
  32. Restaurant: Mr Chow – Schiedam x2
  33. Cheki: the addiction in Japan
  34. CASS Strictly Kpop #8
  35. Artist: Hanggai
  36. Crossfaith in Amsterdam
  37. The Nation´s MC: Yoo Jae Suk
  38. Produce 101 China
  39. Crossfaith (interview)
  40. Special: BTS ARMY (interview)
  41. Food: Ramen
  42. Artist: Jackson Wang
  43. Special: BTSXARMY
  44. SPECIAL: BTS
  45. Movie: The Stand in Thief
  46. Shanghai Natural History Museum
  47. 10 years of SHINee
  48. Drama review: Erased
  49. Movie: Once Upon a Time
  50. Review: Doshirakfever Subscriptionbox
  51. Artist: Miyavi
  52. Hotel: EA Springs Nanjing
  53. 10 Korean Proverbs
  54. What you need to know about Ni no Kuni 2
  55. Restaurant: Kommune Shanghai
  56. Quality K-indie rock music: Say Sue Me
  57. Restaurant: Takumi revisited
  58. Taikang Lu – Tianzifang
  59. Movie Review: Hide and Never Seek
  60. TV: Terrace House Series: Opening new doors
  61. Restaurant Review: Oriental Express
  62. Restaurant Review: Kimchi Boulevard
  63. Religion in Japan
  64. C-Pop
  65. Documentary review: Ramen Heads – ラーメンヘッズ
  66. CinemAsia Amsterdam
  67. Movie review: Last Child – 살아남은 아이
  68. Boygroup: GOT7
  69. Artist: BABYMETAL
  70. Online shopping in China
  71. Restaurant Review: Seoul Sista
  72. Review: Doki Doki Japan Crate
  73. Jinjiang actionpark Shanghai
  74. Boygroup: Day6
  75. Drama Review: Last Friend
  76. Valentine’s day in China
  77. 12 Days of Love in Korea
  78. Valentine’s day in Korea
  79. Valentine’s day in Japan
  80. Terracotta Army
  81. Beauty in Korea
  82. Review: Sapporo – Japan’s oldest beer brand
  83. Chinese New Year
  84. UPDATED Artist: HOLLAND
  85. Review: Snackfever subscription
  86. Cat Cafe
  87. Religion in China
  88. Movie Review: A Werewolf Boy
  89. Review: Asahi Dry Beer
  90. ONE OK ROCK in Amsterdam
  91. Review: Kaomoji
  92. Chopsticks
  93. Drama Review: Save Me
  94. LGBT in Japan
  95. Artist: Zhao Lei
  96. The power of BB Cream
  97. Band: ONE OK ROCK
  98. LGBT in China
  99. Drama Review: The Sound Of Your Heart
  100. Review: Kirin Ichiban
  101. Rental bikes
  102. Drama Review: Strong Woman Do Bong Soon
  103. Movie Review: Before We Vanish
  104. Neko Neko Nii Maid Café: Halloween Pop up event
  105. The Three Sovereigns
  106. LGTB in South Korea
  107. Japanese street food
  108. Shanghai Disney Resort (Halloween)
  109. Mumun Pottery
  110. Boygroup: SF9
  111. Shanghai Comic convention 2017
  112. Izanagi & Izanami
  113. 8 Creepy Chinese Legends
  114. F.T.Island Live [X] Concert in Amsterdam
  115. Movie Review: Alice: Boy From Wonderland
  116. Movie Review: Ichi the Killer
  117. Movie Review: The Precipice Game
  118. 10 Creepy Korean Legends
  119. Movie Review: The house of the disappeared
  120. Halloween in Japan
  121. 10 Creepy Japanese Legends
  122. Halloween in China
  123. Halloween in Korea
  124. Social Media in China? No!
  125. G-Dragon’s World tour Act lll Motte Concert in Amsterdam
  126. Camera Japan Festival
  127. Movie Review: Noise
  128. Heungbu and Nolbu
  129. Konpeitō
  130. Yellow River Valley Civilization
  131. Chinese Street Food
  132. Restaurant Review: Takumi Dusseldorf – Rotterdam
  133. Restaurant review: Set Noodle & Hotpot – Maid cafe edition
  134. Jeulmun Pottery
  135. Boyband: NEWS
  136. Recipe: Sesame Cold noodles
  137. Wild KARD World Tour Lisbon
  138. Recipe: Noodles with a twist
  139. Movie Review: 10 Promises to my dog
  140. Review: Hite
  141. The Rising Sun Flag
  142. Movie Review: Ode to my father
  143. Drama review: Hwarang
  144. Why Koreans “hate” Japanese..
Monday, December 10, 2018
  1. Interview: G.L.A.M.S
  2. Social Media: TikTok
  3. Concert review: GLAMS at Dolhuis Dordrecht
  4. Concert review: LOVEBITES at Patronaat
  5. Busan: A City Which Offers Everything From Beaches To Temples
  6. Empress Wu
  7. Game review: Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum ‘n’ Fun!
  8. Review: Hallyucon
  9. Concert review: Crossfaith at Patronaat
  10. Concert Review: BTS at Amsterdam Ziggodome
  11. Interview: LOVEBITES
  12. Changgyeonggung: A Story Of Overcoming Disaster
  13. Band: TwinkleStar- 闪星乐队
  14. Review: AVO J-music Festival 2018
  15. Korean Skincare; The Way To Amazing Skin?
  16. Drama: Meteor Garden
  17. Concert review: Kamijo in Amsterdam
  18. Concert Review: Music Bank in Berlin
  19. HipHop: Higher Brothers
  20. Album: Ex_Machina – CROSSFAITH
  21. Moon festival
  22. Band: LOVEBITES
  23. Chinese Traditional clothing
  24. Double Concertreview: NECRONOMIDOL
  25. Restaurant: Kimchi House – Den Haag with +20 years KPOP fans
  26. Review: Wish
  27. Toreba: a new way to play crane games!
  28. The city of sea and sake: Niigata
  29. Book: The White Book
  30. Restaurant Review: Daikan – Izakaya Bar
  31. Artist: Busters (버스터즈)
  32. Restaurant: Mr Chow – Schiedam x2
  33. Cheki: the addiction in Japan
  34. CASS Strictly Kpop #8
  35. Artist: Hanggai
  36. Crossfaith in Amsterdam
  37. The Nation´s MC: Yoo Jae Suk
  38. Produce 101 China
  39. Crossfaith (interview)
  40. Special: BTS ARMY (interview)
  41. Food: Ramen
  42. Artist: Jackson Wang
  43. Special: BTSXARMY
  44. SPECIAL: BTS
  45. Movie: The Stand in Thief
  46. Shanghai Natural History Museum
  47. 10 years of SHINee
  48. Drama review: Erased
  49. Movie: Once Upon a Time
  50. Review: Doshirakfever Subscriptionbox
  51. Artist: Miyavi
  52. Hotel: EA Springs Nanjing
  53. 10 Korean Proverbs
  54. What you need to know about Ni no Kuni 2
  55. Restaurant: Kommune Shanghai
  56. Quality K-indie rock music: Say Sue Me
  57. Restaurant: Takumi revisited
  58. Taikang Lu – Tianzifang
  59. Movie Review: Hide and Never Seek
  60. TV: Terrace House Series: Opening new doors
  61. Restaurant Review: Oriental Express
  62. Restaurant Review: Kimchi Boulevard
  63. Religion in Japan
  64. C-Pop
  65. Documentary review: Ramen Heads – ラーメンヘッズ
  66. CinemAsia Amsterdam
  67. Movie review: Last Child – 살아남은 아이
  68. Boygroup: GOT7
  69. Artist: BABYMETAL
  70. Online shopping in China
  71. Restaurant Review: Seoul Sista
  72. Review: Doki Doki Japan Crate
  73. Jinjiang actionpark Shanghai
  74. Boygroup: Day6
  75. Drama Review: Last Friend
  76. Valentine’s day in China
  77. 12 Days of Love in Korea
  78. Valentine’s day in Korea
  79. Valentine’s day in Japan
  80. Terracotta Army
  81. Beauty in Korea
  82. Review: Sapporo – Japan’s oldest beer brand
  83. Chinese New Year
  84. UPDATED Artist: HOLLAND
  85. Review: Snackfever subscription
  86. Cat Cafe
  87. Religion in China
  88. Movie Review: A Werewolf Boy
  89. Review: Asahi Dry Beer
  90. ONE OK ROCK in Amsterdam
  91. Review: Kaomoji
  92. Chopsticks
  93. Drama Review: Save Me
  94. LGBT in Japan
  95. Artist: Zhao Lei
  96. The power of BB Cream
  97. Band: ONE OK ROCK
  98. LGBT in China
  99. Drama Review: The Sound Of Your Heart
  100. Review: Kirin Ichiban
  101. Rental bikes
  102. Drama Review: Strong Woman Do Bong Soon
  103. Movie Review: Before We Vanish
  104. Neko Neko Nii Maid Café: Halloween Pop up event
  105. The Three Sovereigns
  106. LGTB in South Korea
  107. Japanese street food
  108. Shanghai Disney Resort (Halloween)
  109. Mumun Pottery
  110. Boygroup: SF9
  111. Shanghai Comic convention 2017
  112. Izanagi & Izanami
  113. 8 Creepy Chinese Legends
  114. F.T.Island Live [X] Concert in Amsterdam
  115. Movie Review: Alice: Boy From Wonderland
  116. Movie Review: Ichi the Killer
  117. Movie Review: The Precipice Game
  118. 10 Creepy Korean Legends
  119. Movie Review: The house of the disappeared
  120. Halloween in Japan
  121. 10 Creepy Japanese Legends
  122. Halloween in China
  123. Halloween in Korea
  124. Social Media in China? No!
  125. G-Dragon’s World tour Act lll Motte Concert in Amsterdam
  126. Camera Japan Festival
  127. Movie Review: Noise
  128. Heungbu and Nolbu
  129. Konpeitō
  130. Yellow River Valley Civilization
  131. Chinese Street Food
  132. Restaurant Review: Takumi Dusseldorf – Rotterdam
  133. Restaurant review: Set Noodle & Hotpot – Maid cafe edition
  134. Jeulmun Pottery
  135. Boyband: NEWS
  136. Recipe: Sesame Cold noodles
  137. Wild KARD World Tour Lisbon
  138. Recipe: Noodles with a twist
  139. Movie Review: 10 Promises to my dog
  140. Review: Hite
  141. The Rising Sun Flag
  142. Movie Review: Ode to my father
  143. Drama review: Hwarang
  144. Why Koreans “hate” Japanese..
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Street food is ready-to-eat food or drink sold by a vendor in a street or other public place. It is often sold from a portable food booth, food cart, or food truck and meant for immediate consumption. Some street foods are regional, but many have spread beyond their region of origin. Most street foods are classed as both finger food and fast food, and are cheaper on average than restaurant meals. According to a 2007 study from the Food and Agriculture Organization, 2.5 billion people eat street food every day.

 


Eating in China is a great, things aren’t too expensive and you can find almost anything you want. You have food courts in all the big malls that sells food from different countries. All with a Chinese twist of course, like we give Chinese food a western twist. But what I definitely preferred was Chinese Street food! I had a couple of places right below my apartment complex I lived in when I was living in Shanghai that had the best food I’ve ever tasted but all around China you can find different vendors, fruit, crepes, rice balls.  Here are a couple of the most well known street foods Ive seen in Shanghai and if I had them my opinion.


Steamed Buns — instant warm food

Chinese name: 包子 bāozī /baow-dzuh/’wrap(s)’
Taste: savory/sweet stuffing
Main ingredients: flour, pork/vegetables/ sweet bean paste
Average price: 1 yuan

Steamed buns are a common food in China. You can see the mat restaurants or street stalls. They are a popular food for breakfast too. So you can easily buy them in the supermarkets too.

The cook steams the buns in a big steamer, or in several small bamboo steamers. The stuffing is usually savory, like meat or vegetable. But there are also sweet fillings like red bean paste, custard, and sugary black sesame seed. Tell the vendor which kind of stuffing you want, and he/she will pick the right one for you from the steamers.

Two types are found in most parts of China and Indonesia: Dàbāo (大包, “big bun”), measuring about 10 cm across, served individually, and usually purchased for take-away. The other type, Xiǎobāo (小包, “small bun”), measure approximately 5 cm wide, and are most commonly eaten in restaurants, but may also be purchased for take-away. Each order consists of a steamer containing between three and ten pieces. A small ceramic dish is provided for vinegar or soy sauce, both of which are available in bottles at the table, along with various types of chili and garlic pastes, oils or infusions, fresh coriander and leeks, sesame oil, and other flavorings.

You can compare then to the in The Netherlands sold well known Baopao/Bakpao. But the flavour is slightly different, the texture less dry.

Opinion:
I only had these from a vendor once or twice and I’d usually go for the pork ones. They’re nice and sticky and the filling is always perfectly hot. Sometimes it does happen that the sauces/juices pour out when you bite them so be careful when you do. I did buy them more in Japan than China. Where they’re called Manjuu. (PIZZA MANJUU FOR THE WIN).

Zongzi — Sticky rice dumplings

Chinese name: 粽子/Zongzi /dzong-dzrr/
Taste: savory/sweet stuffing
Main ingredients: Egg yolk, Lotus seeds, Ham, Red bean paste, Chestnut, Fatty pork
Average price: 1 yuan

Zongzi is a traditional Chinese food made of glutinous rice stuffed with different fillings and wrapped in bamboo, reed, or other large flat leaves. They are cooked by steaming or boiling. In the Western world, they are also known as rice dumplings or sticky rice dumplings. These dumplings were original a dragon boat festival food but they have grown out to be a general full meal (when on the go) that you can easily buy with vendors and small supermarkets.

The fillings used for zongzi vary from region to region, but the rice used is almost always glutinous rice (also called “sticky rice” or “sweet rice”). Depending on the region, the rice may be lightly precooked by stir-frying or soaked in water before using. In the north, fillings are mostly red bean paste and tapioca or taro. Northern style zongzi tend to be sweet and dessert-like. Southern-style zongzi, however, tend to be more savory or salty. Fillings of Southern-style zongzi include salted duck egg, pork belly, taro, shredded pork or chicken, Chinese sausage, pork fat, and shiitake mushrooms.

Zongzi need to be steamed or boiled for several hours depending on how the rice is made prior to being added, along with the fillings. However, as the modes of zongzi styles have traveled and become mixed, today one can find all kinds of zongzi at traditional markets, and their types are not confined to which side of the Yellow River they originated from.

Opinion:
Oh gosh.. these we’re my life. I’d get them if I were hungry but needed a quick fix because I had to go somewhere.. I still buy them these days from the chinese supermarkets around The Netherlands.
I usually just picked whatever they had, some of the vendors would cut the string for me so I could eat them right away, other times I’d have to peel them off myself. What I learned the hard way is that you do not  take off all of the leave because the rice is really sticky and it’s hard to take off your hands. Try these in when you find them anywhere but especially in China. They are delicious.

Stinky Tofu — These.. need some balls.

Chinese name: 臭豆腐 chòu dòufu /choh doh-foo/ ‘stinking bean curd’
Taste: savory and spicy sauces
Main ingredients: fermented soybean curd
Average price: 4 yuan for five 3cm stinky tofu cubes

Stinky tofu is a form of fermented tofu that has a strong odor. It is usually sold at night markets or roadside stands as a snack, or in lunch bars as a side dish, rather than in restaurants. Unlike cheese, stinky tofu fermentation does not have a fixed formula for starter bacteria; wide regional and individual variations exist in manufacturing and preparation.

The traditional method of producing stinky tofu is to prepare a brine made from fermented milk, vegetables, and meat; the brine can also include dried shrimp, amaranth greens, mustard greens, bamboo shoots, and Chinese herbs. The brine fermentation can take as long as several months.

The vendor has a small wok with plenty of hot oil to deep-fry the stinky tofu in. It’s served in a paper bowl. The brown sauce is usually spicy and salty, and it’s supplemented wonderfully with chopped green onion and parsley.

Opinion:
NO. just no. (But I do want to try them on my trip to China soon). Every night when I would come home in the slightly cooler days there would be a vendor on the other side of the station that would sell Stinky Tofu… I usually had to cover my face from the stench because it really was that bad… I hated the smell and I never once came by a stall during the day that actually sold it so I never tried it.. but the smell….. I heard from a lot of people that it’s great. I’ll get back on that here. Will I really hate it?

Jianbing — But not actually a crepe.

Chinese name:
煎饼馃子 jiānbǐng guǒzī /jyen-bing gwor-dzuh/ ‘pancake cake’
Taste:
savory sauces
Main ingredients:
mung bean flour, wheat flour, green onion, egg, fermented flour sauces
Average price:
5–10 yuan — You can add other ingredients in it for extra cost, like sausage and bacon.

Jianbing is a traditional Chinese street food similar to crepes. It is a type of bing generally eaten for breakfast and hailed as “one of the China’s most popular street breakfasts. The main ingredients of jianbing are a batter of wheat and grain flour, eggs and sauces.[3] It can be topped with different fillings and sauces such as buocui (薄脆 crispy fried cracker), chopped or diced mustard pickles, scallions and coriander, chili sauce or hoisin sauce depending on personal preference. It is often folded several times before serving.

Opinion:
I’ve only seen and had it once, when I was going to the L’arc en Ciel world tour in Shanghai. My friend ordered one for me and I really liked the taste, it was unique. The hard cracker in between with the sweet and sour sauces. I enjoyed it and I want to eat it again!

Shaokao — mmmmmmmm

Chinese name: 烧烤 shāokǎo /shaoww-kaoww/ ‘barbecue’
Taste: savory/spicy
Popular ingredients: lamb, chicken wings, squid, oyster, corn, tofu and anything you they have. It differs with each vendor.
Average price: 3–5 yuan for a skewer

Shaokao is the Chinese translation of “barbecue”. In China, it is mainly found on busy Chinese streets and night markets as a street food sold in food stalls. Usually you get some beer to accompany the spicy items.

Shaokao typically consists of heavily spiced, barbecued foods on skewers. It is available in almost all of the cities in China, and is a prominent dish in Beijing, China.

Opinion:
Right below my apartment was a bbq guy, it was even cheaper than specified on the site I checked and I’d get it at least every friday or saturday. My Japanese roommate and I would get a whole lot of bottles of beer, a whole bunch of food on a stick and we’d eat and drink while watching movies or music videos.
The guy of the stall would usually talk to me in Chinese and I could barely follow, he’d show me spices and what not and try to teach me some chinese while we didn’t even understand each other.
He had different vegetables, meats, fish and all of them were absolutely perfect.

Other things they’d also sell was roasted chestnuts and cooked corn.
These are sold in different countries around the world and also definitely delicious.

I’ll be going to China soon and I’ll update with new or old things I’ve tried!

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(30) year old; crazy about all things Asia, It doesn't stop at these three things.

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